11 05, 2017

Update on @illumina index-swapping: better libraries

By | May 11th, 2017|Categories: Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|Tags: |3 Comments

Index-swapping appears to be driven by excess adapter/primer (Illumina whitepaper). The take-home messages are 1) to use UDIs (unique dual-indexes), and 2) clean-up your libraries to remove left-over adapter/primer. Later in this post I’m going to work through one solution for getting rid of any remaining adapter/primer in an NGS library; but […]

5 05, 2017

Inflection points for @nanopore sequencing

By | May 5th, 2017|Categories: Methods and applications, Nanopore sequencing, Next-generation sequencing|6 Comments

When will nanopore sequencing push short-reads (i.e. Illumina) off their pedestal? According to Clive PromethION is the Illumina killer…but this same conversation was going on many times at London Calling. I wanted to highlight two areas that might be about to flip to ONTs advantage […]

24 04, 2017

Update on @illumina index-swapping: better barcode design

By | April 24th, 2017|Categories: "Experimental design controls etc", Core facilities, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|Tags: , , |2 Comments

Last week I followed up on the index-swapping issue after Illumina released their white paper and also covered what Ethan Linck at The Molecular Ecologist had posted about the Sinha et al BioRxiv paper. In that post I said I’d write a follow-up post about index design over the weekend – here it is! […]

21 04, 2017

Update on @illumina index-swapping

By | April 21st, 2017|Categories: "Experimental design controls etc", Core facilities, Design, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

Illumina released a white paper this week describing their efforts to understand the index-swapping issues with the ExAmp chemistry. This story has been covered many times and got lots of Tweets in the days since the BioRxiv paper from Stanford was uploaded. Megan Molteni at Wired wrote a lengthy […]

31 03, 2017

Mass-cytometry webinars from @Fluidigm

By | March 31st, 2017|Categories: Methods and applications, Other stuff|0 Comments

The Helios/CyToF mass-cytometry technology is making waves here in our Flow Core and is likely to be a useful addition to multi-omic studies. Fluidigm have a series of webinars that I thought readers of Core-Genomics might be interested in: Decoding human tumors and healthy tissue […]

28 03, 2017

What does RNA-Seq mean to you

By | March 28th, 2017|Categories: Core facilities, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

This post is a follow on from my ABRF2017 presentation this morning. Slides are available on SlideShare. RNA-Seq is the most widely published NGS method, but what do researchers mean by the term “RNA-Seq”? Virtually none of them mean sequencing of RNA. Most are talking […]

28 03, 2017

HMW DNA extraction for long-reads on @nanopore or @10XGenomics

By | March 28th, 2017|Categories: 10X Genomics, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|8 Comments

Long-reads require long DNA molecules which require high molecular weight (and undamaged) DNA. Extraction with your standard column is unlikely to be optimal. I’m starting to look at the best methods for HMW DNA extraction for long-read applications as my lab is supporting a couple of […]

22 03, 2017

10X Genomics 10x cheaper…and better too!

By | March 22nd, 2017|Categories: "Experimental design controls etc", 10X Genomics, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing, Single-cell sequencing, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Confession: this post may not actually make your 10X Genomics experiments ten times cheaper…but implement Demuxlet in your workflow and with the right sort of experiment you might just get there! Single-cell RNA-Seq might just have got a whole lot cheaper, thanks to a method […]

15 03, 2017

Cas9 CATCH-seq and lego-brick microfludics

By | March 15th, 2017|Categories: Methods and applications, Nanopore sequencing, Next-generation sequencing, Other stuff|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Two publications presenting really cool technologies recently caught my attention: “Lego for molecular biology” and “CATCH-Seq: CRISPR for target enrichment sequencing”. Both are technologies I’d like to play with, and my son can join in the Lego modelling if we build some here in Cambridge! Lego […]

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