18 10, 2018

Single-cell cancer sequencing on BioRxiv

By | October 18th, 2018|Categories: 10X Genomics, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing, Single-cell sequencing|0 Comments

Three recent papers from Sam Apraicio (@sajraparicio) and Sorab Shah (@SohrabShah) are well worth a read on BioRxiv. In June Kieran Cambell posted a paper describing computational methods to integrate single-cell DNA and RNA-Seq data. And in September Camila de Souza and Emma Laks posted reports […]

16 10, 2018

The dangers of Outlook autocomplete

By | October 16th, 2018|Categories: Other stuff|0 Comments

We’ve all done it. You get a reply from someone saying they don’t think the message was meant for them, and it was simply because Microsoft Outlook autocomplete put the last James you emailed in the address instead of the James you actually meant to […]

21 09, 2018

Cell line variability – what will you do?

By | September 21st, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Last month Nature published a paper that revealed what many scientists knew or suspected. Cancer cell lines evolve very quickly due to positive clonal selection driven by cell culture conditions. And that this is likely the reason why the same cell line used in different labs […]

14 08, 2018

@InnovateUK – Women in Innovation award

By | August 14th, 2018|Categories: Other stuff|0 Comments

Innovate UK is running a competition for Women in Innovation. The £50,000 grant from Innovate Uk can be used for mentoring, coaching and business support. Projects must be linked to the Industrial Strategy Grand Challenges. Read about the 2016 winners and learn how the Innovate UK […]

20 07, 2018

What do people know about genome sequencing and medicine?

By | July 20th, 2018|Categories: I am not a clinician, My genome analysis|0 Comments

Genomes, exomes, panels. Patients, doctors and the general public are hearing about things that simply didn’t exist 10 years ago. IO therapy is big news but TMB, a likely biomarker for immunotherapy response, is a simple concept often poorly explained. It is clear that a […]

29 06, 2018

Making bioweapons harder to biohack

By | June 29th, 2018|Categories: Other stuff|1 Comment

GenomeWeb carry coverage of the work by Battelle Memorial Institute, Harvard University, Virginia Tech, and Ginkgo Bioworks who are all developing methods to detect sequences that could “be put to nefarious use”. This suggests a couple of things to me. First and foremost are these companies […]

21 06, 2018

@Illumina #NovaSeq new mini flowcell

By | June 21st, 2018|Categories: Core facilities, Next-generation sequencing|2 Comments

Illumina released a new NovaSeq flowcell today: S Prime (SP). This allows users to run a very small number of samples and is much more akin to a HiSeq flowcell; one SP flowcells generates 1.6 billion reads or about 4-5 lanes of a HiSeq. It […]

15 06, 2018

Illumina’s revenue in perspective

By | June 15th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|2 Comments

An interesting round up of the Top 10 Sequencing Companies from Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News highlights the dominance of Illumina on the life-sciences (genomics) industry. Illumina’s $2.752 billion in 2017 is almost double the combined revenue of the other 9 companies ($1.445 billion). With giants […]

8 06, 2018

Single-cell indexing for methylation analysis (sci-MET)

By | June 8th, 2018|Categories: Library Prep, Methods and applications, Single-cell sequencing|0 Comments

Andrew Adey’s group at OHSU published sci-MET – a single cell method for whole-genome methylation analysis in Nature Biotech last month: Highly scalable generation of DNA methylation profiles in single cells. In this they described their indexing method and report on an analysis of over 3000 […]

17 05, 2018

Size matters…for cfDNA (and ctDNA)

By | May 17th, 2018|Categories: ctDNA, Library Prep, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

“It’s not the size that matters, it’s what you do with it that counts!” Turns out that the first statement very much does matter when it comes to cell free DNA. It is becoming clearer that the size of cfDNA and ctDNA is information that […]

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