21 06, 2018

@Illumina #NovaSeq new mini flowcell

By | June 21st, 2018|Categories: Core facilities, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

Illumina released a new NovaSeq flowcell today: S Prime (SP). This allows users to run a very small number of samples and is much more akin to a HiSeq flowcell; one SP flowcells generates 1.6 billion reads or about 4-5 lanes of a HiSeq. It […]

17 05, 2018

Size matters…for cfDNA (and ctDNA)

By | May 17th, 2018|Categories: ctDNA, Library Prep, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

“It’s not the size that matters, it’s what you do with it that counts!” Turns out that the first statement very much does matter when it comes to cell free DNA. It is becoming clearer that the size of cfDNA and ctDNA is information that […]

15 05, 2018

Nanostring in Cambridge

By | May 15th, 2018|Categories: Diagnostics Tech, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

On Friday last week I had the pleasure of hosting a half-day Nanostring symposium at Cancer Research UK’s Cambridge Institute (my previous employer). The symposium was arranged as an opportunity to get Nanostring users, and potential users, together to hear about the exciting developments in […]

14 02, 2018

New products from @10XGenomics #AGBT18 workshop

By | February 14th, 2018|Categories: 10X Genomics, Conferences, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

The 10XGenomics workshop just closed at AGBT and they announced some truly revolutionary new applications: single-cell feature barcoding, single-cell ATAC-Seq and single-cell CNV (feat CBGB). I’ll go through each of these in more detail below but I wanted to start by highlighting the success of single-cell analysis […]

7 02, 2018

Transplant patients may help to unlock the secrets of ctDNA

By | February 7th, 2018|Categories: ctDNA, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

Can transplant genomics help better understand ctDNA? Circulating cell free (cfDNA) of tumour (ctDNA) is released by apoptotic and necrotic cells into blood and other bodily fluids. It has transformed NIPT and is transforming Cancer medicine. However the biology behind it’s release is still not […]

16 01, 2018

Illumina index sequencing – where is my sample?

By | January 16th, 2018|Categories: Core facilities, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

Indexed sequencing is vital to the delivering cost-effective, and statistically robust, experiments. Nearly all non-WGS projects are indexed to some degree so understanding how the indexing works is useful; fortunately Illumina produced this handy guide for users: Indexed sequencing overview. After indexed sequencing our reads […]

9 01, 2018

JP Morgan – Illumina and iSeq

By | January 9th, 2018|Categories: Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

iSeq! Illumina’s newest sequencer is the iSeq 100 and costs just $19.5k. Expect 4 million reads, up to 1.2 Gb, in 9-17 hours (approximately 2-3 minute cycle times estimated from the iSeq specifications). This is the deliverable from Project Firefly first mentioned by Jay Flatley at […]

8 01, 2018

JP Morgan 2018

By | January 8th, 2018|Categories: Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

JP Morgan kicks off today and there are sure to be lots of exciting announcements by many of the life science companies we’re all using. I’m particularly interested to hear about new developments in the diagnostics space as my new job is going to be […]

4 01, 2018

Enseqlopedia maps updated

By | January 4th, 2018|Categories: Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

There have been several map updates which I’d not published (apologies to you all). Unfortunately the map was broken yesterday morning and I’m figuring out what’s wrong. Hopefully we’re back to normal service now, while the issues get dealt with in the back end! New […]

3 01, 2018

NGS methods naming discussed in Nature Methods

By | January 3rd, 2018|Categories: Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

I’m really pleased to have a commentary article published in Nature Methods today: A profusion of confusion in NGS methods naming. My colleague Jaques Retief and I have been talking about NGS methods for many years and decided to write this article to highlight some of […]

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