15 05, 2018

Ex vivo perfusion for donor organs: a BBC Tomorrow’s World special

By | May 15th, 2018|Categories: I am not a clinician, Other stuff, Uncategorized, Videos|0 Comments

Last night I watched in amazement as a beating heart was brought into the UK for transplant surgery – the heart was kept alive in the OCS HEART system. The BBC program Heart Transplant: A Chance to Live is outstanding TV and if you can […]

15 05, 2018

Nanostring in Cambridge

By | May 15th, 2018|Categories: Diagnostics Tech, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

On Friday last week I had the pleasure of hosting a half-day Nanostring symposium at Cancer Research UK’s Cambridge Institute (my previous employer). The symposium was arranged as an opportunity to get Nanostring users, and potential users, together to hear about the exciting developments in […]

1 05, 2018

Biotin health supplements may affect lab tests

By | May 1st, 2018|Categories: ctDNA, Diagnostics Tech, Methods and applications, Other stuff|0 Comments

The FDA issued a safety communication today on the risk that biotin supplements “can significantly interfere with certain lab tests and cause incorrect test results”. The FDA communiqué mentions an increase in reported adverse events, and even one death, because of Biotin interference. Biotin interferes with some […]

22 03, 2018

Mulder and Scully would have done wonderful things with a MinION.

By | March 22nd, 2018|Categories: My genome analysis, Nanopore sequencing, Other stuff|0 Comments

For readers of this blog who don’t remember The X-files the reference may be lost on you, but the work published in Genome Research today will not. In Whole-genome sequencing of Atacama skeleton shows novel mutations linked with dysplasia Gary Nolan’s group at Stanford report on […]

19 02, 2018

CRISPR diagnostics

By | February 19th, 2018|Categories: Diagnostics Tech, Methods and applications|2 Comments

Two papers in Science last week show how CRISPR can be used as a diagnostic tool. The first comes from the same team at The Broad that brought us the SHERLOCK method, the second from Jennifer Dounda’s group at Berkley. Both methods promise simple diagnostics […]

14 02, 2018

New products from @10XGenomics #AGBT18 workshop

By | February 14th, 2018|Categories: 10X Genomics, Conferences, Methods and applications, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

The 10XGenomics workshop just closed at AGBT and they announced some truly revolutionary new applications: single-cell feature barcoding, single-cell ATAC-Seq and single-cell CNV (feat CBGB). I’ll go through each of these in more detail below but I wanted to start by highlighting the success of single-cell analysis […]

7 02, 2018

Transplant patients may help to unlock the secrets of ctDNA

By | February 7th, 2018|Categories: ctDNA, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

Can transplant genomics help better understand ctDNA? Circulating cell free (cfDNA) of tumour (ctDNA) is released by apoptotic and necrotic cells into blood and other bodily fluids. It has transformed NIPT and is transforming Cancer medicine. However the biology behind it’s release is still not […]

16 01, 2018

Illumina index sequencing – where is my sample?

By | January 16th, 2018|Categories: Core facilities, Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

Indexed sequencing is vital to the delivering cost-effective, and statistically robust, experiments. Nearly all non-WGS projects are indexed to some degree so understanding how the indexing works is useful; fortunately Illumina produced this handy guide for users: Indexed sequencing overview. After indexed sequencing our reads […]

9 01, 2018

JP Morgan – Illumina and iSeq

By | January 9th, 2018|Categories: Next-generation sequencing|0 Comments

iSeq! Illumina’s newest sequencer is the iSeq 100 and costs just $19.5k. Expect 4 million reads, up to 1.2 Gb, in 9-17 hours (approximately 2-3 minute cycle times estimated from the iSeq specifications). This is the deliverable from Project Firefly first mentioned by Jay Flatley at […]

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